Saturday, June 23

Tag: sketch

This Soldier’s Sketchbook Offers A Heartbreaking Look Into Life On The Battlefield

This Soldier’s Sketchbook Offers A Heartbreaking Look Into Life On The Battlefield

Blog
For civilians, imagining what it's like to go to war is limited to what we see in photographs and what we hear in soldiers' stories. While we can try picture what many of these people dealt with, we'll never really be able to see it through their eyes. However, one man's drawings give us a glimpse into his wartime experiences. Before Victor A. Lundy became a renowned architect, he was a soldier in the U.S. 26th Infantry Division during World War II, and he even became a part of the Allied invasion of Normandy. The then 21-year-old always had a sketchbook on him, in which he drew everyday scenes he encountered. What's really special about the drawings is that they give one individual's unique perspective of life on the battlefield. From training a...
What Started As A Few Scribbles On A Canvas Turned Into Something Unbelieveable

What Started As A Few Scribbles On A Canvas Turned Into Something Unbelieveable

Blog
For many artists, the process of creating a piece is even more important than the finished product. While that may seem strange to the average observer, anyone with a background in art can tell you that watching a piece come to life is often more fulfilling than seeing the culmination of their efforts.That's why it's a privilege to see art in action. One illustrator named Jake Lockett recently created an incredibly intricate woodland scene, and he was kind enough to let us watch it evolve into something extraordinary. It all starts with a sketch. YouTube / Jake Lockett And the addition of color brings a whole new dimension to the piece. YouTube / Jake Lockett The end result is something out o...
These Scribbles Look Like Nothing At First, But Watch What She Does With Them

These Scribbles Look Like Nothing At First, But Watch What She Does With Them

Blog
It's no secret that artists tend to look at life from a different angle. After all, having an atypical worldview is conducive to creativity. Illustrator Mary Doodles came up with a fun series with some help from her friend Dante, and each piece starts with a few lines. In the video below, she tells Dante to close his eyes and scribble on a blank sheet of paper. From there, she puts on her creative thinking cap and gives these scattered marks a new lease on life. This is what Mary Doodles had to work with when Dante was done. YouTube / Mary Doodles And this is the finished product. Pretty incredible, right? YouTube / Mary Doodles To see how she created this masterpiece, check out the vide...